Bill C-51 Just passed. Where do we go from here?

Bill C-51 Just passed. Where do we go from here?

Posted by Soledad Vega on Tuesday, June 9, 2015 – 12:38

This just in from Ottawa: The Senate just passed Bill C-51 today by 44-28, despite massive opposition from hundreds of thousands of everyday Canadians and the country’s top privacy experts. Reckless Bill C-51 will now become Canadian law.

Here’s who sided with Canadians: Most of the independent Senators from the Liberal Party and independent Progressive Conservative Elaine McCoy.  Thanks to each and every one of them for doing the right thing and trying to prevent this dangerous Bill from becoming law. Sadly, Conservative Senators were able to use their majority to ignore Canadians and force this bill through.

In light of the damning evidence of the surveillance abuses Bill C-51 allows, the Parliament had an opportunity to protect the Charter of Rights and listen to what Canadians were demanding.

It’s no secret that this is bad news. When the world’s largest security-oriented intergovernmental organization says Bill C-51 violates the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, you know this bill is a real threat.

As Debra Davidson from our social community puts it, “The Senate has failed miserably at stopping bills such as Bill C-51 over the past decade or two, due to voting along party lines, rather than upholding their sworn duty to protect the Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms of their citizens.”

But at OpenMedia we have been fighting bad legislation that would hamper our online rights and freedoms online for years now. This vote means we need to keep fighting all the way through to the October election. We will make sure every Canadian voter knows where their representatives stood when it mattered most.

We’re going to need every single one of you as we turn to our larger mission: Kill Bill C-51.

Above all, Bill C-51 underlines just how stark Canada’s privacy deficit has become. And we need a comprehensive approach to fix it. That’s why, over the last weeks we launched our very own Privacy Plan, a positive pro-privacy action plan, packed with ideas from 125,000 Canadians, aimed at addressing Canada’s privacy deficit. We had the chance to meet with MP Justin Trudeau and hand him this crowdsourced report with the common sense steps to strengthen privacy safeguards for all of us.

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The next stage of this fight will be absolutely crucial: Over 240,000 Canadians have now signed the petition against the bill at StopC51.ca and tens of thousands more have inundated MPs with letters, phone calls, emails and tweets to express their opposition. This, without a doubt, has become one of the largest campaigns in Canadian history.

Kill Bill C-51secret police

In this context, and with a federal election around the corner, Canadian MPs and candidates know there’ll be a real political price to pay for voting through this reckless, dangerous, and ineffective legislation.

We’ve been hearing more and more voices like the one from our community member Kyle Young saying “If you vote for Bill C-51, your party, and you will never receive another vote from myself, or family ever again in our lives.”

This is why we are not giving up. Now we’ve got to take the next step and get all parties to repeal Bill C-51.

So far the NDP and the Green Party have pledged to repeal the unpopular legislation, and the Liberals went from supporting it wholeheartedly to being more cautious and promising amendments (or even voting against it in the case of the independent Liberal Senators). It is time to put pressure on all the major political parties to commit to kill bill C-51, and demand accountability for those who haven’t committed to do so.

Our long-term goal is clear — the complete repeal of Bill C-51, a recognition of the privacy rights of the Canadian people, and strong accountability and oversight for surveillance practices.

It’s never been more important to add your voice to our growing campaign. You can pitch in by signing our petition at KillC51.ca, by using our quick tool to get a letter published in your local newspaper, or by chipping in to power this fight over the long run at https://OpenMedia.org/privacy/donate

We’ll continue fighting, Canada! Together we can #KillC51.Action Image_KillC-51crop

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HANNIBAL CANNIBAL HARPER a PUPPET of the KHAZARIAN CABAL Is Taking Canadian’s to War in Syria for the real Criminal Terrorist WAKE UP CANADA

ISIS mission: Canadian airstrikes on Syria could come within days

Conservatives say military strikes in Syria are legally justified and necessary

The Canadian Press Posted: Mar 30, 2015 6:04 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 31, 2015 7:05 AM ET

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper rises to vote to extend Canada's involvement in airstrikes against ISIS and expand the mission into Syria for up to a year.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper rises to vote to extend Canada’s involvement in airstrikes against ISIS and expand the mission into Syria for up to a year. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

 

Canadian fighter jets will soon be launching airstrikes in Syria now that the House of Commons has approved the federal government’s plan to expand and extend its military mission in Iraq.​

 

Federal MPs voted 142-129 in favour of a motion extending the mission for up to a full year and authorizing bombing runs in Syria against targets belonging to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

A senior government source told CBC News that Canada could begin airstrikes on Syrian targets within a day or two.

The original mission deployed six CF-18 fighter jets, one CC-150 Polaris air-to-air refuelling aircraft, two CP-140 Aurora surveillance aircraft. Some 600 aircrew and other personnel are currently deployed.

Up to 69 special forces advisers will also remain in the region to advise and assist Kurdish peshmerga forces in their efforts to beat back the advance of ISIS militants.

Operation IMPACT

A CF-18 Hornet from Air Task Force-Iraq engages in nighttime air-to-air refuelling with a CC-150T Polaris during Canada’s combat mission against ISIS. MPs will vote Monday on whether to extend the mission for a year and expand the mandate to authorize airstrikes in Syria. (Canadian Forces Combat Camera)

The Conservatives say military strikes in Syria are legally justified and necessary, and that Canada has a moral obligation to do its part to beat back the global threat of terrorism.

“While the coalition has succeeded in stopping ISIL’s territorial spread, the global threat that ISIL poses remains,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper said in a statement after the vote.

“In particular, we cannot stand on the sidelines while ISIL continues to promote terrorism in Canada as well as against our allies and partners, nor can we allow ISIL to have a safe haven in Syria,” Harper said.

Neither the NDP nor the Liberals supported the original mission, nor its extension, arguing the government had not adequately made the case for going to war in the first place and in the six months since, haven’t been honest with Canadians about it the mission’s true scope.

NDP amendments fail

The New Democrats had sought to amend the motion to remove Canadians from combat and refocus all the government’s efforts on humanitarian work. Their amendments failed to pass.

The Conservatives say the plan to allow Canadian fighter jets to bomb ISIS targets within Syria would not be to prop up Assad. Islamic State fighters are using the eastern part of that country as a base and cannot be allowed to do so, they argue.

The opposition has argued that Canada lacks the legal basis to expand air strikes into Syria without that country’s express consent, something the Conservatives had said last year they would seek before expanding the mission.

The government’s premise that those strikes are legal because they are in Canada’s self-defence does not hold water, the opposition says — an argument supported by the fact no other Western nation besides the U.S. is involved there.

“This is a serious ethical problem for Canada. Dismissing it betrays the government’s lack of knowledge about a region that could suck Canada into decades of conflict,” said NDP Leader Tom Mulcair during the debate Monday.

“The prime minister tells Canadians that we can either bomb Iraq and Syria, or sit on the sidelines. That’s a false choice.”

Irwin Cotler abstains from vote

Liberal MP Irwin Cotler, well-respected by all MPs on matters of international law and human rights, had said he would abstain from the vote in part because of the government’s Syrian approach.

“In October, I was unable to support the government’s motion because of the Prime Minister’s statement that Canada would give a veto to the criminal Assad regime,” he said in a statement.

“I remain unable to support the government in this matter because its proposed expansion of Canada’s mission continues to allow Assad to assault Syrian civilians with impunity.”

Former Liberal MP Scott Andrews, now sitting as an Independent following his expulsion from caucus over allegations of sexual harassment, broke ranks with his former party and voted with the Conservatives in favour.

The extended timeline for the mission is in part so that a renewal wouldn’t come during this fall’s federal election.

Should they form government, the NDP have said they’d immediately pull Canada out of the bombing campaign, and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau has said he would do the same.

The Liberals, would, however, increase the number of soldiers sent to train Iraqis to fight ISIS.

But with no clear end goal for the bombing mission, Trudeau said Monday, it’s not one his party can support.

“Will our involvement in this mission end next March, or was the foreign affairs minister being more truthful when he explicitly compared this war to Afghanistan, saying that we are in this for the longer term,” Trudeau said.

“We cannot allow rhetorical appeals to moral clarity to disguise the absence of a plan.”

Among other things, Trudeau called for a massive expansion of Canada’s resettlement program for refugees from the conflict and for more Canadian soldiers to be involved in training Iraqi forces.

There was no obligation for Parliament to vote on the mission before it began, but the Harper government has made it a practice to hold a vote prior to military deployments.