Bill C-51 Just passed. Where do we go from here?

Bill C-51 Just passed. Where do we go from here?

Posted by Soledad Vega on Tuesday, June 9, 2015 – 12:38

This just in from Ottawa: The Senate just passed Bill C-51 today by 44-28, despite massive opposition from hundreds of thousands of everyday Canadians and the country’s top privacy experts. Reckless Bill C-51 will now become Canadian law.

Here’s who sided with Canadians: Most of the independent Senators from the Liberal Party and independent Progressive Conservative Elaine McCoy.  Thanks to each and every one of them for doing the right thing and trying to prevent this dangerous Bill from becoming law. Sadly, Conservative Senators were able to use their majority to ignore Canadians and force this bill through.

In light of the damning evidence of the surveillance abuses Bill C-51 allows, the Parliament had an opportunity to protect the Charter of Rights and listen to what Canadians were demanding.

It’s no secret that this is bad news. When the world’s largest security-oriented intergovernmental organization says Bill C-51 violates the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, you know this bill is a real threat.

As Debra Davidson from our social community puts it, “The Senate has failed miserably at stopping bills such as Bill C-51 over the past decade or two, due to voting along party lines, rather than upholding their sworn duty to protect the Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms of their citizens.”

But at OpenMedia we have been fighting bad legislation that would hamper our online rights and freedoms online for years now. This vote means we need to keep fighting all the way through to the October election. We will make sure every Canadian voter knows where their representatives stood when it mattered most.

We’re going to need every single one of you as we turn to our larger mission: Kill Bill C-51.

Above all, Bill C-51 underlines just how stark Canada’s privacy deficit has become. And we need a comprehensive approach to fix it. That’s why, over the last weeks we launched our very own Privacy Plan, a positive pro-privacy action plan, packed with ideas from 125,000 Canadians, aimed at addressing Canada’s privacy deficit. We had the chance to meet with MP Justin Trudeau and hand him this crowdsourced report with the common sense steps to strengthen privacy safeguards for all of us.

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The next stage of this fight will be absolutely crucial: Over 240,000 Canadians have now signed the petition against the bill at StopC51.ca and tens of thousands more have inundated MPs with letters, phone calls, emails and tweets to express their opposition. This, without a doubt, has become one of the largest campaigns in Canadian history.

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In this context, and with a federal election around the corner, Canadian MPs and candidates know there’ll be a real political price to pay for voting through this reckless, dangerous, and ineffective legislation.

We’ve been hearing more and more voices like the one from our community member Kyle Young saying “If you vote for Bill C-51, your party, and you will never receive another vote from myself, or family ever again in our lives.”

This is why we are not giving up. Now we’ve got to take the next step and get all parties to repeal Bill C-51.

So far the NDP and the Green Party have pledged to repeal the unpopular legislation, and the Liberals went from supporting it wholeheartedly to being more cautious and promising amendments (or even voting against it in the case of the independent Liberal Senators). It is time to put pressure on all the major political parties to commit to kill bill C-51, and demand accountability for those who haven’t committed to do so.

Our long-term goal is clear — the complete repeal of Bill C-51, a recognition of the privacy rights of the Canadian people, and strong accountability and oversight for surveillance practices.

It’s never been more important to add your voice to our growing campaign. You can pitch in by signing our petition at KillC51.ca, by using our quick tool to get a letter published in your local newspaper, or by chipping in to power this fight over the long run at https://OpenMedia.org/privacy/donate

We’ll continue fighting, Canada! Together we can #KillC51.Action Image_KillC-51crop

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Six Issues Canadian Election Won’t Touch

Six Issues Canadian Election Won’t Touch

May 1, 2011

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Update. As you know by now, the Harper Conservatives won a majority of 167 seats. A reaction against the string of needless elections, and fear of the NDP (socialist) resurgence resulted in 40% of the electorate coalescing around the Conservatives, sufficient for a majority. The NDP did become the official opposition with about 104 seats. The Liberals were devastated with about 34.   
by Henry Makow Ph.D.
Rich in natural resources, Canada rode out the recession unscathed. The unemployment rate is only 7.7%, less than the 35-year average (8.53%.) The Canadian dollar is now worth $1.05 US.
The Harper minority government has provided competent if uninspired leadership. But rather than be grateful, Canadians are voting today in their fifth election in the last 10 years.
Style, not substance, brought down the Harper government. The Opposition spoke of a “democratic deficit” and charged them with “contempt of parliament.”  The Harper Conservatives weren’t sensitive enough to the feelings and prerogatives of the Opposition parties.
The world is going to hell and spoiled Canadians are squabbling over these niceties (while avoiding defining issues which I will discuss below.) 
Nevertheless, this unnecessary and unwanted election may actually bring some superficial change. The majority of Canadians are left-leaning. They like government social programs, cushy jobs and hand-outs.  Harper’s government is a little less generous and more business-oriented. Harper himself seems remote. 
Until now, the Left  vote was divided between three parties, the Liberals, the NDP and the regional Bloq Quebecois. But polls indicate that a general  crankiness has led to a large swing to the socialist NDP.
This has thrown predictions into disarray. Will the NDP divide the Left sufficiently to give Harper the majority of seats he covets? Or will it set the stage for a Left-leaning coalition government? Or will there be stalemate and gridlock? We’ll find out tonight. 
DEFINING ISSUES
Apart from who gets the handouts, people or corporations, there have been no defining issues. All four parties are generally agreed, or don’t want to risk alienating anyone by bringing them up. I suspect all four leaders are Freemasons or affiliated in some way. Here is a comparison of the party platforms. As you can see, they differ only in emphasis.
As a result, there is an air of unreality about this election. Here are six issues which would have made it real.      
1.  The handling of the G-20 Summit in Toronto last June: The billion dollar cost of “security” has been a minor issue. But the decision to use the conference as a NWO martial law exercise is not an issue. 1105 peaceful demonstrators were arrested and thrown into makeshift concentration camps.  This was the largest mass arrest in Canadian history. Undercover cops dressed up as violent anarchists, broke windows and set fires to police cars. Only 99 charges were laid. A thousand people were rounded up for no good reason. It was a national disgrace. The Harper government is extremely vulnerable on this issue yet the so-called “Opposition” parties have not made it an issue.
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2. Harper’s pandering to Israel and Zionism. Harper has said “Canada will defend Israel whatever the cost.” Excuse me? Israel is the world’s fifth largest nuclear power. Canada is a military pipsqueak in comparison. Harper had nothing but praise for Israel’s slaughter of 900 non-combatants in Gaza in Dec. 2008. The Opposition leader has murmured about Canada returning to the role of honest broker, but neither he nor the NDP have made this an issue. There is a lot of anti-Zionist feeling in Canada, especially Quebec, but apparently the Masonic lodge has agreed on this one. Many Canadian Jews are also uncomfortable with Harper’s carte blanche for Israel.
Harper’s main fundraiser is a Jewish billionaire named Irving Gerstein. According to Wikipedia: “On February 23, 2011, Irving Gerstein was charged along with Senator Doug Finley for violations of the Canada Elections Act. Elections Canada alleges Irving Gerstein was complicit in a scheme that involved filing false tax claims and exceeding federal spending limits on campaign advertisements. If found guilty Gerstein faces up to a year in prison and fines exceeding $25,000.”           
3. Immigration. “Multiculturalism” has always been an issue too important to world government to allow Canadians (or Americans) to debate it. Any demurrals have been stigmatized as “racism.” Canada used to be a country of European Christian origin with a vibrant ethnic minority. It is becoming an Asian-Latin-African country with a European minority.
India, Japan, China, Nigeria, Mexico, Brazil, South Africa and Israel would not allow their cultural character to be transformed by migration. Yet the Illuminati bankers will not let Canada, the US and other people of European Christian origin have their own national homelands. Again, no political party will touch this issue because they are all in the same camp.     
4. Libya. The Canada I grew up in did not do the Rothschilds’ killing in far off places like Afghanistan and Libya. Canada spent $20 billion and lost 160 soldiers in Afghanistan. It has sent six CF-18’s to bomb Libya and kill Gadhafi’s children. China, Russia, Brazil, Germany and India abstained. Germany and Italy bowed out of NATO operations. All four Canadian political parties agreed to do it. This could have been a defining election issue. It is not. 
5. The “Security and Prosperity Partnership Agreement,”  the integration of North America is continuing behind the scenes. All opposition parties have signed on. 
“The SPP is a treasonous metamorphosis  of our federal and provincial government bureaucracies into formal instruments to implement the agenda of  the shadow government … dominated by the U.S Council on Foreign Relations, and the US military apparatus.
“Since March 2005, under the direction of three senior cabinet ministers of each country, about 100 working groups of unelected officials from government and industry have been meeting at taxpayer expense …restructuring of the apparatus of governance…implementing changes in our border crossings, in our airports, on our airplanes, in our skies, on and to our roads and highways, in our personal identification systems, in our health, in our vaccines, over our food supplements, in our pesticide safety  levels, in our schools and  universities, in the exploitation of our natural resources-our rivers, lakes, oil, gas, in our environment, in the arms industry, in the manufacture and use of  depleted uranium, in the exploitation of and experimentation on our indigenous people and our military personnel, in immigration, over our right of Habeas Corpus, in our right of due process, our right to assemble and our freedom of speech, etc., etc.”
6. Monetary Independence
The Statute of Westminster (1931) gave Canada the political freedom to make all domestic and foreign decisions but the ownership of the Canadian Federal Government didn’t change. On its heels came the birth of the Bank of Canada in 1934. The British Crown stepped behind the curtain to allow the appearance of autonomy, but it remained in full force through the field of finance.
“Her Majesty owns the Bank of Canada. The personal and corporate income taxes paid by Canadians are the profits for the Bank of Canada. These profits go to Her Majesty and the Bank of England, absorbing more than 10% of the GNP of Canada every year.”
“The ruling political party in Ottawa is not the real Government of Canada. They are the middle managers separating the owners from the Canadian people. The British Crown, Rothschilds and other European families own the Corporation of the Government of Canada. The British Crown owns the Bank of Canada.”
“Canada is not a sovereign nation but a private club, unknown to most Canadians. This is why the Queen’s face still appears on Canadian currency.”
Isn’t democracy an effective way to dupe the masses? That’s why everyone must vote.
CONCLUSION
Like most countries, Canada is controlled by the Rothschild banking cartel (“the Crown”, the “Bank of England” etc.) which controls our government’s credit. We will not be free until we control our own credit and renounce the portion of the debt that was created out of nothing.
The reason there are no defining issues is because our “leaders” are all working indirectly for the banking cartel, which controls the corporations and unions which finance them. The voter decides who implements the banker’s policy, with perhaps a degree of emphasis one way or the other. 
Canadians have been uniquely favored. But a people who take their good fortune for granted and fail to address the real underlying issues, eventually regret it.

6 deceptive stories Stephen Harper will tell you during the 2015 election

6 deceptive stories Stephen Harper will tell you during the 2015 election

With a federal election less than nine months away, Stephen Harper is already polishing his stump speech.

The prime minister just offered an early indication of the themes — and track record — he will trumpet on the campaign trail.

But from banks to budget watchdogs, second-guessing the government has become a popular hobby these days. 

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On Tuesday, the parliamentary budget officer estimated the government could face an $8.2 billion revenue shortfall this year, and run a deficit even after they use up their contingency fund.

We offer a fact check of the campaign cards Harper — and his government — are likely to repeatedly play in the months ahead:

1. Stephen Harper is creating “full-time, high-paying” jobs

At his first campaign-style event of 2015, here’s what Harper had to say about his jobs record:

“We have had steady economic growth in Canada for over five years, and employment has risen considerably …

Since the worst of the recession, the Canadian economy has created nearly 1.2 million jobs – overwhelmingly full-time, high-paying, private-sector jobs.”

Let’s take this one apart point-by-point:

(a) Since Harper came to power in 2006, workers in two of Canada’s biggest provinces – Ontario and British Columbia – have seen their wages go down. In the rest of the country, wages have largely been driven by the price of oil, a boom that has since gone bust.

(b) Last year, Canada only created 32,000 permanent jobs. Meanwhile, temporary jobs skyrocketed to 110,000:

(c) Employment has not “risen considerably” over the last five years. The percentage of Canadians who have a job is as low as it was at the worst point of the recession:

2. Stephen Harper is investing “big time” in infrastructure

The prime minister is talking big on infrastructure:

“We’re also investing, big time – the biggest federal investments ever – in infrastructure.

We’ve launched a massive program – over 75 billion dollars – in contributions to all manner of provincial, territorial, community, and, of course, our own federal infrastructure projects.”

Actually, that money is spread out over 10 years — so $75 billion becomes more like $7.5 billion per year.

Provinces have also said it isn’t enough, and called additional funding “overdue” at a finance ministers’ meeting in December.

3. Stephen Harper has a child care plan

Harper would also like you to believe he has a child care plan:

“Effective this spring, we are increasing and expanding the Universal Child Care Benefit. Families will receive an additional 60 dollars per child under six, for a monthly total per child of 160 dollars …

Friends, our opponents have been clear. They would take away the Universal Child Care Benefit …

And, of course, they would, because they need the higher taxes to pay for their gigantic spending promises. And what they take from your families they will give to a child-care bureaucracy.”

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Here’s a few things to know about that:

  • In many places across Canada, child care costs can now range in the area of between $800 – $1,200 per month
  • The expanded UCCB of $160/month is still a drop in the bucket of what most parents pay in child care costs. With median child care costs in Toronto are $15,888 per year, the UCCB still leaves parents paying $13,968 – that’s only 12% of parents’ overall costs.
  • The “child care bureaucracy” (a line borrowed from American Tea Partiers in their fight against Obamacare) Harper worries about (meaning a national day care program) would actually be less expensive than the UCCB, boost the economy and create jobs. 
  • As for Harper’s “opponents” plan to “take away the Universal Child Care Benefit”: the NDP’s Mulcair has said categorically he will not cancel the UCCB (instead allowing parents to collect the UCCB in addition to $15/day child care). The Liberals, meanwhile, have not offered a position one way or the other on the UCCB.

4. Stephen Harper has a tax cut for families – just probably not your family…

And Harper wants you to believe your family is getting a $2,000 tax cut:

“And we are, at the same time, honoring our promise to deliver the Family Tax Cut by introducing income-splitting for families with children.

That’s a benefit of up to another two thousand dollars annually!”

What he doesn’t tell you is those in line to get the $2,000 are the highest income earners with a stay-at-home spouse. Low and middle-income families with two working parents will see little to nothing:

A new Tuesday report from the CCPA shows that families earning more than $233,000 will benefit the most from the income-splitting plan.

5. Stephen Harper’s tough-on-crime policy spree

And don’t forget the part where Harper claims he ended crime!

“Friends, our Government is also proud of all we have done to keep Canadians and our streets and communities safe.

We have been cracking down on violent crime …

Canadians expect us to protect them from the worst kind of criminal, those people who truly deserve to be called a menace to society.”

Post media’s Stephen Maher recently argued the declining crime rate can largely be attributed to demographics — the aging baby-boom echo has meant a shrinking population of men ages of 15 and 24.

But the Tories tough-on-crime policies have led to higher incarceration rates — even as crime is falling, Maher argues: “It’s likely that his policies — more incarceration — have made us less safe, since prison often makes criminals worse, not better.” 

Oh, and also on the crime front, Harper trumpeted an anti-prostitution law that has been roundly criticized by legal experts, criminologists and sex workers’ advocacy groups:

“To protect vulnerable women, our anti-prostitution law targets pimps and johns.”  

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6. Stephen Harper’s leadership

In his Sunday speech, Harper set his own parameters for good leadership:

“As I’ve said before, the measure of good government – the true test of leadership – lies not in achieving success in times of stability and peace, but doing so during times of risk and danger.”

Of course, risk and danger are exactly what the Canadian economy faces thanks to the collapse of oil prices. And critics say the Conservatives overreliance on a boom-and-bust resource economy is one of the key factors that has placed Canada in such financial uncertainty.

Hence the delayed budget, lowered interest rate and gloomy Tuesday outlook from the parliamentary budget officer. None of those stories fit with Harper’s narrative of “prudent choices” that “have secured economic opportunities now, and for future generations.” 

So, about that “measure of good government”…