Six Issues Canadian Election Won’t Touch

Six Issues Canadian Election Won’t Touch

May 1, 2011

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Update. As you know by now, the Harper Conservatives won a majority of 167 seats. A reaction against the string of needless elections, and fear of the NDP (socialist) resurgence resulted in 40% of the electorate coalescing around the Conservatives, sufficient for a majority. The NDP did become the official opposition with about 104 seats. The Liberals were devastated with about 34.   
by Henry Makow Ph.D.
Rich in natural resources, Canada rode out the recession unscathed. The unemployment rate is only 7.7%, less than the 35-year average (8.53%.) The Canadian dollar is now worth $1.05 US.
The Harper minority government has provided competent if uninspired leadership. But rather than be grateful, Canadians are voting today in their fifth election in the last 10 years.
Style, not substance, brought down the Harper government. The Opposition spoke of a “democratic deficit” and charged them with “contempt of parliament.”  The Harper Conservatives weren’t sensitive enough to the feelings and prerogatives of the Opposition parties.
The world is going to hell and spoiled Canadians are squabbling over these niceties (while avoiding defining issues which I will discuss below.) 
Nevertheless, this unnecessary and unwanted election may actually bring some superficial change. The majority of Canadians are left-leaning. They like government social programs, cushy jobs and hand-outs.  Harper’s government is a little less generous and more business-oriented. Harper himself seems remote. 
Until now, the Left  vote was divided between three parties, the Liberals, the NDP and the regional Bloq Quebecois. But polls indicate that a general  crankiness has led to a large swing to the socialist NDP.
This has thrown predictions into disarray. Will the NDP divide the Left sufficiently to give Harper the majority of seats he covets? Or will it set the stage for a Left-leaning coalition government? Or will there be stalemate and gridlock? We’ll find out tonight. 
DEFINING ISSUES
Apart from who gets the handouts, people or corporations, there have been no defining issues. All four parties are generally agreed, or don’t want to risk alienating anyone by bringing them up. I suspect all four leaders are Freemasons or affiliated in some way. Here is a comparison of the party platforms. As you can see, they differ only in emphasis.
As a result, there is an air of unreality about this election. Here are six issues which would have made it real.      
1.  The handling of the G-20 Summit in Toronto last June: The billion dollar cost of “security” has been a minor issue. But the decision to use the conference as a NWO martial law exercise is not an issue. 1105 peaceful demonstrators were arrested and thrown into makeshift concentration camps.  This was the largest mass arrest in Canadian history. Undercover cops dressed up as violent anarchists, broke windows and set fires to police cars. Only 99 charges were laid. A thousand people were rounded up for no good reason. It was a national disgrace. The Harper government is extremely vulnerable on this issue yet the so-called “Opposition” parties have not made it an issue.
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2. Harper’s pandering to Israel and Zionism. Harper has said “Canada will defend Israel whatever the cost.” Excuse me? Israel is the world’s fifth largest nuclear power. Canada is a military pipsqueak in comparison. Harper had nothing but praise for Israel’s slaughter of 900 non-combatants in Gaza in Dec. 2008. The Opposition leader has murmured about Canada returning to the role of honest broker, but neither he nor the NDP have made this an issue. There is a lot of anti-Zionist feeling in Canada, especially Quebec, but apparently the Masonic lodge has agreed on this one. Many Canadian Jews are also uncomfortable with Harper’s carte blanche for Israel.
Harper’s main fundraiser is a Jewish billionaire named Irving Gerstein. According to Wikipedia: “On February 23, 2011, Irving Gerstein was charged along with Senator Doug Finley for violations of the Canada Elections Act. Elections Canada alleges Irving Gerstein was complicit in a scheme that involved filing false tax claims and exceeding federal spending limits on campaign advertisements. If found guilty Gerstein faces up to a year in prison and fines exceeding $25,000.”           
3. Immigration. “Multiculturalism” has always been an issue too important to world government to allow Canadians (or Americans) to debate it. Any demurrals have been stigmatized as “racism.” Canada used to be a country of European Christian origin with a vibrant ethnic minority. It is becoming an Asian-Latin-African country with a European minority.
India, Japan, China, Nigeria, Mexico, Brazil, South Africa and Israel would not allow their cultural character to be transformed by migration. Yet the Illuminati bankers will not let Canada, the US and other people of European Christian origin have their own national homelands. Again, no political party will touch this issue because they are all in the same camp.     
4. Libya. The Canada I grew up in did not do the Rothschilds’ killing in far off places like Afghanistan and Libya. Canada spent $20 billion and lost 160 soldiers in Afghanistan. It has sent six CF-18’s to bomb Libya and kill Gadhafi’s children. China, Russia, Brazil, Germany and India abstained. Germany and Italy bowed out of NATO operations. All four Canadian political parties agreed to do it. This could have been a defining election issue. It is not. 
5. The “Security and Prosperity Partnership Agreement,”  the integration of North America is continuing behind the scenes. All opposition parties have signed on. 
“The SPP is a treasonous metamorphosis  of our federal and provincial government bureaucracies into formal instruments to implement the agenda of  the shadow government … dominated by the U.S Council on Foreign Relations, and the US military apparatus.
“Since March 2005, under the direction of three senior cabinet ministers of each country, about 100 working groups of unelected officials from government and industry have been meeting at taxpayer expense …restructuring of the apparatus of governance…implementing changes in our border crossings, in our airports, on our airplanes, in our skies, on and to our roads and highways, in our personal identification systems, in our health, in our vaccines, over our food supplements, in our pesticide safety  levels, in our schools and  universities, in the exploitation of our natural resources-our rivers, lakes, oil, gas, in our environment, in the arms industry, in the manufacture and use of  depleted uranium, in the exploitation of and experimentation on our indigenous people and our military personnel, in immigration, over our right of Habeas Corpus, in our right of due process, our right to assemble and our freedom of speech, etc., etc.”
6. Monetary Independence
The Statute of Westminster (1931) gave Canada the political freedom to make all domestic and foreign decisions but the ownership of the Canadian Federal Government didn’t change. On its heels came the birth of the Bank of Canada in 1934. The British Crown stepped behind the curtain to allow the appearance of autonomy, but it remained in full force through the field of finance.
“Her Majesty owns the Bank of Canada. The personal and corporate income taxes paid by Canadians are the profits for the Bank of Canada. These profits go to Her Majesty and the Bank of England, absorbing more than 10% of the GNP of Canada every year.”
“The ruling political party in Ottawa is not the real Government of Canada. They are the middle managers separating the owners from the Canadian people. The British Crown, Rothschilds and other European families own the Corporation of the Government of Canada. The British Crown owns the Bank of Canada.”
“Canada is not a sovereign nation but a private club, unknown to most Canadians. This is why the Queen’s face still appears on Canadian currency.”
Isn’t democracy an effective way to dupe the masses? That’s why everyone must vote.
CONCLUSION
Like most countries, Canada is controlled by the Rothschild banking cartel (“the Crown”, the “Bank of England” etc.) which controls our government’s credit. We will not be free until we control our own credit and renounce the portion of the debt that was created out of nothing.
The reason there are no defining issues is because our “leaders” are all working indirectly for the banking cartel, which controls the corporations and unions which finance them. The voter decides who implements the banker’s policy, with perhaps a degree of emphasis one way or the other. 
Canadians have been uniquely favored. But a people who take their good fortune for granted and fail to address the real underlying issues, eventually regret it.

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6 deceptive stories Stephen Harper will tell you during the 2015 election

6 deceptive stories Stephen Harper will tell you during the 2015 election

With a federal election less than nine months away, Stephen Harper is already polishing his stump speech.

The prime minister just offered an early indication of the themes — and track record — he will trumpet on the campaign trail.

But from banks to budget watchdogs, second-guessing the government has become a popular hobby these days. 

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On Tuesday, the parliamentary budget officer estimated the government could face an $8.2 billion revenue shortfall this year, and run a deficit even after they use up their contingency fund.

We offer a fact check of the campaign cards Harper — and his government — are likely to repeatedly play in the months ahead:

1. Stephen Harper is creating “full-time, high-paying” jobs

At his first campaign-style event of 2015, here’s what Harper had to say about his jobs record:

“We have had steady economic growth in Canada for over five years, and employment has risen considerably …

Since the worst of the recession, the Canadian economy has created nearly 1.2 million jobs – overwhelmingly full-time, high-paying, private-sector jobs.”

Let’s take this one apart point-by-point:

(a) Since Harper came to power in 2006, workers in two of Canada’s biggest provinces – Ontario and British Columbia – have seen their wages go down. In the rest of the country, wages have largely been driven by the price of oil, a boom that has since gone bust.

(b) Last year, Canada only created 32,000 permanent jobs. Meanwhile, temporary jobs skyrocketed to 110,000:

(c) Employment has not “risen considerably” over the last five years. The percentage of Canadians who have a job is as low as it was at the worst point of the recession:

2. Stephen Harper is investing “big time” in infrastructure

The prime minister is talking big on infrastructure:

“We’re also investing, big time – the biggest federal investments ever – in infrastructure.

We’ve launched a massive program – over 75 billion dollars – in contributions to all manner of provincial, territorial, community, and, of course, our own federal infrastructure projects.”

Actually, that money is spread out over 10 years — so $75 billion becomes more like $7.5 billion per year.

Provinces have also said it isn’t enough, and called additional funding “overdue” at a finance ministers’ meeting in December.

3. Stephen Harper has a child care plan

Harper would also like you to believe he has a child care plan:

“Effective this spring, we are increasing and expanding the Universal Child Care Benefit. Families will receive an additional 60 dollars per child under six, for a monthly total per child of 160 dollars …

Friends, our opponents have been clear. They would take away the Universal Child Care Benefit …

And, of course, they would, because they need the higher taxes to pay for their gigantic spending promises. And what they take from your families they will give to a child-care bureaucracy.”

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Here’s a few things to know about that:

  • In many places across Canada, child care costs can now range in the area of between $800 – $1,200 per month
  • The expanded UCCB of $160/month is still a drop in the bucket of what most parents pay in child care costs. With median child care costs in Toronto are $15,888 per year, the UCCB still leaves parents paying $13,968 – that’s only 12% of parents’ overall costs.
  • The “child care bureaucracy” (a line borrowed from American Tea Partiers in their fight against Obamacare) Harper worries about (meaning a national day care program) would actually be less expensive than the UCCB, boost the economy and create jobs. 
  • As for Harper’s “opponents” plan to “take away the Universal Child Care Benefit”: the NDP’s Mulcair has said categorically he will not cancel the UCCB (instead allowing parents to collect the UCCB in addition to $15/day child care). The Liberals, meanwhile, have not offered a position one way or the other on the UCCB.

4. Stephen Harper has a tax cut for families – just probably not your family…

And Harper wants you to believe your family is getting a $2,000 tax cut:

“And we are, at the same time, honoring our promise to deliver the Family Tax Cut by introducing income-splitting for families with children.

That’s a benefit of up to another two thousand dollars annually!”

What he doesn’t tell you is those in line to get the $2,000 are the highest income earners with a stay-at-home spouse. Low and middle-income families with two working parents will see little to nothing:

A new Tuesday report from the CCPA shows that families earning more than $233,000 will benefit the most from the income-splitting plan.

5. Stephen Harper’s tough-on-crime policy spree

And don’t forget the part where Harper claims he ended crime!

“Friends, our Government is also proud of all we have done to keep Canadians and our streets and communities safe.

We have been cracking down on violent crime …

Canadians expect us to protect them from the worst kind of criminal, those people who truly deserve to be called a menace to society.”

Post media’s Stephen Maher recently argued the declining crime rate can largely be attributed to demographics — the aging baby-boom echo has meant a shrinking population of men ages of 15 and 24.

But the Tories tough-on-crime policies have led to higher incarceration rates — even as crime is falling, Maher argues: “It’s likely that his policies — more incarceration — have made us less safe, since prison often makes criminals worse, not better.” 

Oh, and also on the crime front, Harper trumpeted an anti-prostitution law that has been roundly criticized by legal experts, criminologists and sex workers’ advocacy groups:

“To protect vulnerable women, our anti-prostitution law targets pimps and johns.”  

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6. Stephen Harper’s leadership

In his Sunday speech, Harper set his own parameters for good leadership:

“As I’ve said before, the measure of good government – the true test of leadership – lies not in achieving success in times of stability and peace, but doing so during times of risk and danger.”

Of course, risk and danger are exactly what the Canadian economy faces thanks to the collapse of oil prices. And critics say the Conservatives overreliance on a boom-and-bust resource economy is one of the key factors that has placed Canada in such financial uncertainty.

Hence the delayed budget, lowered interest rate and gloomy Tuesday outlook from the parliamentary budget officer. None of those stories fit with Harper’s narrative of “prudent choices” that “have secured economic opportunities now, and for future generations.” 

So, about that “measure of good government”…

Hannibal Cannibal Stephen Harper Regime, Canada’s FKN Nightmare!!! Will it END soon ??? All Honest Canadians can do Is HOPE because Election here are fixed just as they are in the USA

Much Ado About Stupidity: Stephen Harper is a Criminal (List of Crimes)

In Canada on April 13, 2011 at 12:02

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Harper at Bilderberg Meeting

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Okay, so I think the above is a good start.  I won’t take credit for the images below, they are from www.nabert.org , but I think they sum a lot of the above up nicely. 

via muchadoaboutstupidity.blogspot.com

perfect…now go vote!

OCC

Much Ado About Stupidity is on the HEADS of all CANADIAN’S  FOR ALLOWING THIS CRIMINAL TO CONTINUES ON SO LONG UNABATED

WAKE UP FELLOW FOOL CANADIAN’s

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Harper is now a PM fleeing his own past

By Michael Harris | May 14, 2015 8:59 pm THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

More from Michael Harris available here.

My congratulations to Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservative party; they’ve found an even better form of voter suppression than robocalls. They have refused to participate in the TV debates put on for every general election by Canada’s network television consortium since 1968 — back when voter turnout was north of 75 per cent.

For the life of me, I don’t know why the PM blessed Maclean’s with the task of conducting the debate, when party spokesperson Kory Teneycke and the elite journalists of 24/7 were standing at the ready, fully funded by the taxpayers, to get the job done.

I guess Steve didn’t want the 10 million viewers that CTV, Global and the CBC have to offer. After all, a mass audience would only give his opponents a bigger opening to track for the entire nation the death spiral of democracy and the rule of law in Canada — to say nothing of the parody of Conservative ethical values the Harper regime now represents.

Maybe that’s why Harper wanted a change of moderators. Steve Paikin earned a reputation as a fair and impartial moderator in the 2008 and 2011 debates. Maybe that was a problem. Or maybe it was the fact that his son, Zach, tried to run for the Liberals.

The real reason for Harper’s sudden attack of cold feet is probably the Alberta election — which offered an object lesson in how a strong debate performance can change everything. Jim Prentice didn’t have enough spinners and fear-merchants to scupper the radiant sincerity of Rachel Notley.

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There are a lot of things Steve might not want to be confronted with in a well-watched, well-researched television debate. Despite balanced budgets, low unemployment and a booming commodity export market under the Liberals, corruption and accountability dominated the 2006 election. The defining moment of the 2006 debate came when Stephen Harper said: “Will you tell us Mr. Martin, how many criminal investigations are going on in your government?”

Martin was defeated by the Ad Sponsorship scandal, an elaborate kickback scheme that saw public money directed back to the Liberal party. Martin wore it even though he wasn’t involved. To his credit, and for all the right reasons, he assembled his own firing squad in the form of the Gomery Commission.

For all the wrong reasons, Steve never called an inquiry into the robocalls scandal. Trust me — you will never see a boomerang leave Steve’s hands if he can help it.

At the time Steve asked Martin that question about criminal investigations in 2006, the correct answer would have been “two”. If someone were to ask Steve the same question during the 2015 debate, he wouldn’t have enough fingers on both hands to compute the response. By my count, the Harper team has been the subject of at least 15 investigations. The stable which he was supposed to muck out has become a pigsty on his watch.

The Conservatives cheated in the 2006 election. Criminal charges of improper election spending were dropped in March 2012 as part of a plea deal. The CPC pleaded guilty to exceeding election spending limits and submitting fraudulent election records. They chequebooked their way out of the slime — paying a $52,000 fine and then repaying a further $230,198.

The PM’s former parliamentary secretary, Dean Del Mastro, has been convicted on three counts of election fraud arising out of the 2008 election. He is now facing the possibility of jail time. His cousin, David Del Mastro, is also facing charges related to the 2008 election.

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What about the conviction of Guelph Conservative party worker Michael Sona? Although the robocall case has faded from view, it remains an unsolved crime — because although the existence of a conspiracy was acknowledged by two judges, the conspirators themselves remain unknown. Now that Elections Canada has been castrated by the ‘Fair Elections Act’, their identities probably will never be known.

Peter Penashue, former minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, had to step down after it was alleged that corporations had made illegal contributions to his 2011 campaign. He paid back $47,000 to Elections Canada.

open quote 761b1bThe Harper team had to put the debate cobra back in the basket in order to avoid to limit the damage from these and other embarrassments. And it’s not like the hits haven’t kept hitting.

When Penashue resigned, Stephen Harper stood in the House and described him as “the best Member of Parliament Labrador ever had”. Which was astounding. Has a Canadian prime minister ever made a clearer statement condoning cheating?

Although Penashue set up the website for his byelection campaign before he even announced his resignation, he lost to the Liberals — the PM’s bankrupt endorsement notwithstanding. Earlier this month, Penashue’s official agent in the 2011 campaign, Reg Bowers, was charged with three counts under the Canada Elections Act.

And then there’s the little matter of Harper’s Senate appointments. Senator Mike Duffy has been charged with 31 offences related to Senate spending. If convicted he faces financial ruin, probably jail time. The prime minister is on record as saying he knew nothing about the secret $90,000 payment from his chief of staff to Duffy.

Is there anyone beyond his immediate family (and possibly Paul Calandra) who still believes that?

HCSH Traitor

What if someone asked a question during a televised debate about the PMO riding herd on an independent audit committee, viewing and altering a report protected by parliamentary privilege before it was published? What if someone asked about that February 22, 2013 meeting with Nigel Wright, where the PM allegedly agreed to make Duffy pay back the money, even though Wright felt that under the rules the senator might not owe it? Is there anyone left alive over voting age in this country who hasn’t heard about Nigel Wright’s infamous “good to go from the PM” email?

And there’s still Senator Pamela Wallin, who has not been charged but who remains under RCMP investigation for expense fraud. Stuck in political and legal purgatory, she’s another Senate pick that Harper has to wear.

Suspended Senator Patrick Brazeau, who now manages a strip club, will be guest referee at a Great North Wrestling match in Ottawa scheduled for May 30, starring ‘Hannibal The Death Dealer’ and ‘Soa (Spirit of Allah) Amin’. Another personal choice of the PM.

Brazeau is facing two trials on personal matters: for assault and sexual assault, and for assault, threats and possession of cocaine. A framed photo of Brazeau, the PM and the alleged victim in this case has been entered into evidence at Brazeau’s ongoing sexual assault trial. The court has set aside 12 days in June for a preliminary trial on Brazeau’s Senate expense charges — the very day that Duffy’s trial is scheduled to resume. That trial could easily run into the fall election.

Former Harper advisor Bruce Carson — already a man with a criminal record before his first day on the job in the PMO — is facing charges for influence peddling related to his work at the University of Calgary. He also will be going to court in the fall on similar charges related to a water purification company whose product he was trying to flog to native bands.

And then there’s Arthur Porter, still fighting extradition from Panama back to Canada on fraud charges related to a Montreal hospital contract with SNC Lavalin. They involve an alleged $22 million in kickbacks to the good doctor and others. (Porter has cancer and has had three months to live … for several years now. The miracle of self-treatment.)

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Harper appointed Porter as head of SIRC, the body that oversees CSIS. The passage of Bill C-51 leaves Canada the only nation in the Five Eyes intelligence partnership that does not have parliamentary oversight. If Porter hadn’t been caught, he might still be in charge of the oversight committee monitoring CSIS. Steve the talent scout strikes again.

The Harper team had to put the debate cobra back in the basket in order to avoid to limit the damage from these and other embarrassments. And it’s not like the hits haven’t kept hitting: Take that humiliating security breach while the PM was doing a ‘surprise’ flying tour of the front in Iraq. Despite making journalists sign an agreement stating they would not take photos of special forces soldiers for security reasons, the PMO posted photos showing their faces on 24/7, the government’s nauseous, in-house propaganda site. All marketing, all the time.

Confronted with this bozo rush to make political hay, the PMO said the military vetted the videos before they were published online. It took eight hours for the Nightmare Team to admit the videos were a security breach, to take them down, and to give one of those half-assed non-apologies this government does so well.

The Globe and Mail learned that, contrary to what the PMO said, the Department of National Defence hadn’t screened the videos before they were posted. An honest mistake, or just another reflexive lie from a government that makes it up as it goes along?

Remember, DND had taken the blame for a cabinet-level bungle before. When the mission in Iraq was expanded into Syria, the Harper government claimed that it was because Canada was the only other member of the coalition besides the U.S. with smart bombs. When it turned out everyone had them, Defence Minister Jason Kenney attached the goat horns to the Chief of the Defence Staff, who meekly wore them. Not this time.

Mike Duffy has said that the prime minister didn’t order him to repay the expense money because he owed it: “It’s not about what you did,” Harper said, according to Duffy. “It’s about the perception of what you did that’s created in the media. The rules are inexplicable to our base.”

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Steve’s record of misrule is every bit as hard to explain — something that should become crystal clear once he’s forced to answer for it, in public and on camera.

Michael Harris is a writer, journalist, and documentary filmmaker. He was awarded a Doctor of Laws for his “unceasing pursuit of justice for the less fortunate among us.” His nine books include Justice Denied, Unholy Orders, Rare ambition, Lament for an Ocean, and Con Game. His work has sparked four commissions of inquiry, and three of his books have been made into movies. His new book on the Harper majority government, Party of One, is a number one best-seller.

HANNIBAL CANNIBAL HARPER a PUPPET of the KHAZARIAN CABAL Is Taking Canadian’s to War in Syria for the real Criminal Terrorist WAKE UP CANADA

ISIS mission: Canadian airstrikes on Syria could come within days

Conservatives say military strikes in Syria are legally justified and necessary

The Canadian Press Posted: Mar 30, 2015 6:04 AM ET Last Updated: Mar 31, 2015 7:05 AM ET

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper rises to vote to extend Canada's involvement in airstrikes against ISIS and expand the mission into Syria for up to a year.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper rises to vote to extend Canada’s involvement in airstrikes against ISIS and expand the mission into Syria for up to a year. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

 

Canadian fighter jets will soon be launching airstrikes in Syria now that the House of Commons has approved the federal government’s plan to expand and extend its military mission in Iraq.​

 

Federal MPs voted 142-129 in favour of a motion extending the mission for up to a full year and authorizing bombing runs in Syria against targets belonging to the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.

A senior government source told CBC News that Canada could begin airstrikes on Syrian targets within a day or two.

The original mission deployed six CF-18 fighter jets, one CC-150 Polaris air-to-air refuelling aircraft, two CP-140 Aurora surveillance aircraft. Some 600 aircrew and other personnel are currently deployed.

Up to 69 special forces advisers will also remain in the region to advise and assist Kurdish peshmerga forces in their efforts to beat back the advance of ISIS militants.

Operation IMPACT

A CF-18 Hornet from Air Task Force-Iraq engages in nighttime air-to-air refuelling with a CC-150T Polaris during Canada’s combat mission against ISIS. MPs will vote Monday on whether to extend the mission for a year and expand the mandate to authorize airstrikes in Syria. (Canadian Forces Combat Camera)

The Conservatives say military strikes in Syria are legally justified and necessary, and that Canada has a moral obligation to do its part to beat back the global threat of terrorism.

“While the coalition has succeeded in stopping ISIL’s territorial spread, the global threat that ISIL poses remains,” Prime Minister Stephen Harper said in a statement after the vote.

“In particular, we cannot stand on the sidelines while ISIL continues to promote terrorism in Canada as well as against our allies and partners, nor can we allow ISIL to have a safe haven in Syria,” Harper said.

Neither the NDP nor the Liberals supported the original mission, nor its extension, arguing the government had not adequately made the case for going to war in the first place and in the six months since, haven’t been honest with Canadians about it the mission’s true scope.

NDP amendments fail

The New Democrats had sought to amend the motion to remove Canadians from combat and refocus all the government’s efforts on humanitarian work. Their amendments failed to pass.

The Conservatives say the plan to allow Canadian fighter jets to bomb ISIS targets within Syria would not be to prop up Assad. Islamic State fighters are using the eastern part of that country as a base and cannot be allowed to do so, they argue.

The opposition has argued that Canada lacks the legal basis to expand air strikes into Syria without that country’s express consent, something the Conservatives had said last year they would seek before expanding the mission.

The government’s premise that those strikes are legal because they are in Canada’s self-defence does not hold water, the opposition says — an argument supported by the fact no other Western nation besides the U.S. is involved there.

“This is a serious ethical problem for Canada. Dismissing it betrays the government’s lack of knowledge about a region that could suck Canada into decades of conflict,” said NDP Leader Tom Mulcair during the debate Monday.

“The prime minister tells Canadians that we can either bomb Iraq and Syria, or sit on the sidelines. That’s a false choice.”

Irwin Cotler abstains from vote

Liberal MP Irwin Cotler, well-respected by all MPs on matters of international law and human rights, had said he would abstain from the vote in part because of the government’s Syrian approach.

“In October, I was unable to support the government’s motion because of the Prime Minister’s statement that Canada would give a veto to the criminal Assad regime,” he said in a statement.

“I remain unable to support the government in this matter because its proposed expansion of Canada’s mission continues to allow Assad to assault Syrian civilians with impunity.”

Former Liberal MP Scott Andrews, now sitting as an Independent following his expulsion from caucus over allegations of sexual harassment, broke ranks with his former party and voted with the Conservatives in favour.

The extended timeline for the mission is in part so that a renewal wouldn’t come during this fall’s federal election.

Should they form government, the NDP have said they’d immediately pull Canada out of the bombing campaign, and Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau has said he would do the same.

The Liberals, would, however, increase the number of soldiers sent to train Iraqis to fight ISIS.

But with no clear end goal for the bombing mission, Trudeau said Monday, it’s not one his party can support.

“Will our involvement in this mission end next March, or was the foreign affairs minister being more truthful when he explicitly compared this war to Afghanistan, saying that we are in this for the longer term,” Trudeau said.

“We cannot allow rhetorical appeals to moral clarity to disguise the absence of a plan.”

Among other things, Trudeau called for a massive expansion of Canada’s resettlement program for refugees from the conflict and for more Canadian soldiers to be involved in training Iraqi forces.

There was no obligation for Parliament to vote on the mission before it began, but the Harper government has made it a practice to hold a vote prior to military deployments.